Chancellor Joanne Li talks about the university’s goals

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Staff at the University of Nebraska at Omaha gathered for the inauguration of Chancellor Joanne Li. “UNO is at the heart of the city and represents the best in metropolitan communication,” said the system’s president. ‘University of Nebraska, Ted Carter. At the heart of the UN is Li. She is the first Asian-American woman of color to hold a leadership position in the UN system. “It is also an opportunity to show what the UN has achieved so far,” Li said. The past two years have brought many challenges. “The last two years have actually tested higher education to understand that you can’t do things the same way,” Li said. She hopes to achieve several goals through more financial aid for students and workforce development. “The UN’s point of view is to develop quality manpower development so that our talents leave the UN and support the prosperity of the state’s economic development,” Li said. Terri Crawford, a teacher at the UN, has already seen some of the decisions Li made. “Positions have been created so that we are more aligned with the strategic initiative, which is to address social justice, class, race and equity,” Crawford said. Students also notice her on campus. “I really like his commitment to our community,” said Lydia Kirkland. Kirkland studies music and is a junior in college. She said she struggled to return to in-person classes. “I did the majority of my piano experience online,” Kirkland said. She wants Li and the school to look at a learning perspective that goes beyond COVID-19. “How can we also continue to use some of the things we learned from Covid in the way we are still learning,” Kirkland said. Li agrees that school can be tough. “The road to the finish line is full of obstacles,” Li said. She has a message for the community: “The UN has arrived,” Li said. to receive us or not.” The last chancellor of the University of Nebraska Omaha was Jeffrey Gold.

Staff at the University of Nebraska at Omaha gathered for the inauguration of Chancellor Joanne Li.

“UNO is at the heart of the city and represents the best in metropolitan communication,” said University of Nebraska system president Ted Carter.

At the heart of the UN is Li. She is the first Asian-American woman of color to hold a leadership position in the UN system.

“It’s also an opportunity to show what the UN has achieved so far,” Li said.

The past two years have brought many challenges.

“The last two years have actually tested higher education to understand that you can’t do things the same way,” Li said.

She hopes to achieve several goals through greater financial aid for students and workforce development.

“The UN’s point of view is to develop quality manpower development so that our talents leave the UN and support the prosperity of the state’s economic development,” Li said.

Terri Crawford, a teacher at the UN, has already seen some of the decisions Li made.

“Positions have been created so that we are more aligned with the strategic initiative, which is to address social justice, class, race and equity,” Crawford said.

Students also notice her on campus.

“I really like his commitment to our community,” said Lydia Kirkland.

Kirkland studies music and is a junior in college. She said she struggled to return to in-person classes.

“I did the majority of my piano experience online,” Kirkland said.

She wants Li and the school to look at a learning perspective that goes beyond COVID-19.

“How can we also continue to use some of the things we learned from Covid in the way we’re still learning,” Kirkland said.

Li agrees that school can be tough.

“The road to the finish line is full of obstacles,” Li said.

She has a message for the community:

“The UN has arrived,” Li said. “It’s just a matter of who is ready to receive us or not.”

The last chancellor of the University of Nebraska Omaha was Jeffrey Gold.

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