Deaf Education Program Founder Retires | California Lutheran University

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Maura Martindale, Associate Professor in the Department of Learning and Teaching at the Graduate School of Education, led this unique program which prepared more than 100 people to teach the growing number of students with hearing loss.

Photo: Brian Stethem

(THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. – May 26, 2022) The founding director of California Lutheran University’s Deaf and Hard of Hearing Program for future teachers retires with emeritus status on Tuesday.

Maura Martindale, a Thousand Oaks resident and associate professor in the Department of Learning and Teaching at the Graduate School of Education, led this unique program that prepared more than 100 people to teach the growing number of students with hearing loss.

Although she is retiring, Martindale will continue to instruct future teachers and therapists through a newly released manual. She and Sylvia Rotfleisch, who teaches part-time at Cal Lutheran, wrote “Listening and Spoken Language Therapy for Children with Hearing Loss: A Practical Auditory-Based Guide.”

Martindale began teaching part-time at Cal Lutheran in 2005. With a grant, she developed the university’s two-year part-time program to prepare teachers to work with the growing number of children with cancer. cochlear implants and digital hearing aids whose families ask to speak. language programs in general education institutions. Candidates can obtain a preliminary specialist education diploma and a master’s degree in education of the deaf and hard of hearing.

She started the program at the university’s Woodland Hills Center in 2007 and became a full-time faculty member. Cal Lutheran’s program is the only one in California focused on spoken language that prepares teachers to work with students over the age of 6.

In 2011, Martindale received a $1.2 million program grant from the United States Department of Education to address the shortage of teachers willing to work with people who are deaf and hard of hearing. The grant provided support for prospective teachers and helped the university close the large achievement gap between hearing and hearing-impaired students, especially those from Latin American families.

Martindale was also chairman of the Department of Learning and Teaching and a member of several university committees. In 2014, she received the Graduate School of Education Award for Outstanding Achievement in Teaching.

She began her career teaching general education students in public schools before teaching and directing programs at the John Tracy Center Clinic for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children for more than two decades. Martindale holds a bachelor’s degree in history and elementary education from Annhurst College, a master’s degree in deaf education from Smith College, and a doctorate in instructional leadership from the University of Southern California.

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